Advice

Choosing the Right Person to Lead a Company Move 

Whether you are moving your start-up out of the garage or downsizing because more employees are working remotely, you probably have a mile-long moving checklist. After all, moving is notoriously time-consuming with all the tasks jammed in-between searching for a new location and unpacking. However, no one said you have to tackle your company move on your own. In fact, hiring someone else to lead your move can make the experience far less taxing, more efficient, and an overall success. Not to mention, it also allows you to keep your focus where it belongs—on your business.

But how do you choose the right person to lead a company move? Ask yourself these 5 questions to find the perfect hire

1. What Needs to Be Done?

Before you even look at candidates to spearhead a company move, you need to figure out exactly what you need a move manager for. Look through your office moving checklist and see what tasks you want to delegate.

These may include:

  • Making a moving schedule
  • Finding a new office space
  • Creating a floorplan for the new location
  • Upgrading the organization system and decluttering
  • Keeping employees informed
  • Contacting utility companies
  • Scheduling installs and renovations
  • Getting quotes from commercial moving companies
  • Sourcing moving supplies
  • Ensuring building and elevator access for move-in day
  • Setting up the new office

2. What Skills and Experience are Ideal?

Now that you’ve figured out precisely what you want your move manager to be doing consider what skills and experience would help them excel at the position. Of course, management experience and people skills are all a good baseline but consider specifics that apply to each task.

Will they be responsible for finding the perfect office space? If they have experience with your industry, this is a huge plus. It is one thing to tell them what you are looking for and the accommodations you seek, but it is another to be able to assess a space with firsthand knowledge. Plus, someone that understands your business is generally better suited to make an office floorplan. They know where equipment can be safely placed, as well as where it will be most efficient.

Do you want them to take care of organizing the new office? If you are doing an internal hire and know a candidate’s desk is usually cluttered and unorganized, maybe they aren’t the best fit.

3. New Hire or Internal Promotion?

Speaking of hiring from within the company, you need to decide whether it is best to promote from within or bring in someone new in altogether. Internal hires and external hires both have their benefits and downfalls.

Internal Hire: You know how they fit in with the company culture, as well as how other employees feel about this person. You also have had a firsthand view of their strengths and weaknesses. However, an internal hire means that their regular job will be far less productive or put on pause completely. If it is the former, they won’t be giving their full attention to moving tasks.

External Hire: This person’s sole job is to deal with the move and nothing else, so you know they are giving every task the attention it deserves. You can even seek out someone who specializes in managing commercial moves, usually called an Office Move Manager. An Office Move Manager can offer skills and extensive experience that you can’t find internally. The downside? You won’t have the same loyalty and trust as with an internal hire and employees may feel less comfortable with a new hire. Plus, it can be hard to assess how they will fit in with the company as a whole.

4. Do They Fit Company Culture?

Even though a move manager is a temporary position, it is essential the hire fits in with the company.

You want to do your best to keep your employees happy and informed during this transition and a big part of this will boil down to your move manager. Moving is a stressful time for employees, and part of your move manager’s job should be dealing with employee concerns and relaying information regarding the move to the team. However, if your move manager’s style is a mismatch for the atmosphere of your company, things can quickly go awry. For example, if your company has a relaxed atmosphere and you bring someone in who’s management style is akin to a drill sergeant, this will only increase your employee’s stress. This can decrease employee satisfaction during the moving process and even reduce employee retention.

5. Can They Do the Job with Minimal Disruption?

The best person to lead a company move should be able to do it with as little disruption as possible. This means that they aren’t delegating tasks around the office and your team can carry on with business as usual. Minimal disruption is important to not only keep stress at bay but also to safeguard productivity during a move.

Generally, all your employees should have to do is pack up their own desk—unless they volunteer to help with additional moving tasks. So make sure your move manager knows minimal disruption is ideal and has a management style that works in collaboration with this.

Choosing the right person to lead your company move is truly one of the best ways to not only ensure your move is a success but to propel your business into the next stage with ease.  Less stress and more efficiency are just a glimpse at what you can gain from this simple hire. Commercial moves are a massive undertaking and letting someone else take the reins is one of the best ways to ensure the transition is a positive experience for both you and your employees.

 

Author bio

Nancy Zafrani is the general manager of Oz Moving & Storage in NYC. A day-one employee of Oz, she has 25 years of experience in the moving industry. As a New Yorker, Nancy also has lots of experience dealing with small apartments and organizing.

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Mercy - CBNation

This is a post from a CBNation writer. CBNation is a Business to Business (B2B) Brand focusing on increasing the visibility of and providing resources for CEOs, entrepreneurs and business owners. CBNation consists of blogs(CEOBlogNation.com), podcasts (CEOPodcasts.com) and videos (CBNation.tv). CBNation is proudly powered by Blue 16 Media.

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